Archive for the ‘Leadership’ Category

Increase Your Influence – Before the Meeting Even Starts!

Pamela Jett, CSP

Slide1Would you like to be taken more seriously by your leader?  Are you looking to enhance your influence and make a bigger impact on your organization’s goals and objectives?  Are you seeking to attain the attention, authority, and respect you have earned? Would you like others. especially your leaders, to see you as a motivated, engaged, and high-value team player who is ready to take on even more opportunities?

If so, meetings and other group conversations present a fabulous opportunity to shine.  Chances are, you are doing the basics:

  • You are well prepared.
  • You participate readily and with confidence.
  • You follow-up on your action items.
  • You are supportive and open-minded to the contributions of others.
  • You stay focused on the subject at hand and don’t engage in disruptive behaviors.

However, are you making the most of the opportunity to shine even before the meeting starts? Here are some powerful strategies to leverage.

  • Words to choose and words to lose. Stop using the phrase “I have to go to a meeting” and change it to “I get to go to a meeting.”  When you use the phase “have to” it makes it sound like it is something you don’t want to do.  It can give the impression that others choose for you and you are not empowered or in charge of your own choices.  It might even signal to some that you have a “victim mentality.”  When you make the small change and start to say “I get to” you send a message that you are excited and are glad to be part of the meeting.  You sound empowered, positive, and engaged.  This is a small change that can make a big difference in how you are perceived by others.  Be intentional in your word choice because words matter.
  • Get on the agenda.  Not every meeting or conversation has an agenda (although most meetings ought to if they want to be effective.)  When there is an agenda, maximize that opportunity.  If you have a proposal you want to make, a question you would like to pose, or solution to a problem, or any other meaningful contribution you want to make during the meeting, contact the person running that meeting and ask for some agenda time.  They may not give it to you. However, simply asking shows that you are engaged and ready to participate proactively.  This is especially important if the person running the meeting is your leader.  Don’t wait for them to assign you something.  Be proactive.  Ask yourself, “what meaningful contribution to this meeting can I make?”  And, ask for agenda time if appropriate.  Even if you opt not to ask for agenda time, asking yourself “what meaningful contribution can I make?” can help position you to participate in a meaningful and impactful ways. When I work with executives who are looking for their team members to enhance their communication skills, one of the #1 requests is “please help my team members take more initiative, take more ownership, be more proactive.”  Get on the agenda and you will be demonstrating leadership abilities and be seen as more proactive and engaged.
  • Arrive early.  There are many good reasons to be slightly early to every meeting.  You minimize the risk of arriving late due to be waylaid in the hallways.  You increase the chances of getting a good seat in the room. You will be seen as reliable, respectful, and engaged.  And, you can leverage those few minutes to your advantage.  Put away the cell phones (even if you are standing in the hall waiting for the conference room to be vacated by the previous occupants) and engage in conversation with others who have arrived.  Stop texting and introduce yourself to people you may not know.  Ask a colleague how a project is progressing.  Make small talk.  Look people in the eye.  Smile. Be friendly.  Be professional. Be present.  You will create a memorable impression by having short conversations with those around you. Building your professional network is important and meetings are a great place to do so.  Get to know people and you can easily do that in 5 minutes or so when you arrive early.

Meetings present a tremendous opportunity for you to shine.  Make the most of the opportunities you have to communicate in a confident, professional, and engaged fashion.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

 

Bookmark and Share

Leaders Unleash the Power of “Yes”

11107790 - voting concept: set of green yes signs isolated on white backgroundAs a leader, have you unleashed the power of yes with your team?  In particular, are you offering unequivocal “yeses” as often as possible? Every leader or manager knows that saying “yes” to an idea, proposal, or request can positively impact morale, engagement, and performance. The power of a “yes” is that it encourages more problem-solving, initiative, and proactivity in a team and among team members.  Unfortunately, many leaders are sabotaging or minimizing the impact of a “yes” by using phrases such as:

  • “Yes, this is good and we should also…” 
  • Yes, I like it.  But, could you also…”
  • “Yes and I would suggest that we…”
  • Yes, but first…”

While these forms of “yes” are still positive (and have their place in the language of leadership), they are also a form of yes with diluted or diminished impact.  When a leader adds a term or condition to their “yes” they are saying to the team or team member that the proposal or idea isn’t good enough to be implemented as it is. Or, at least not good enough yet.  Or, that it could be much better. This “qualified yes” can be disheartening and can decrease motivation and commitment.

Of course, there are times when the “qualified yes” is the smart choice.  As long as it is a choice and not a habit. If you constantly, habitually, or unintentionally qualify all of your positive responses, you may be missing out on the power of the “unequivocal yes.”

When I conduct programs for organizations and associations on leadership and communication, I often ask attendees what behaviors do their leaders engage in (or fail to engage in) that enhance employee engagement or decrease employee engagement. One of the consistent “engaging behaviors” is the “unequivocal yes.”  A “yes” with no conditions, no added value, no tweaks or adjustments.  A “yes” that says to the employee or team “I trust you.” These “yeses” sound like:

  • “Yes, go for it!”
  • “I like it.  Make it happen.”
  • “Great idea. Let’s do it.”

Think about it. Wouldn’t you feel great if your leader simply said “yes” to your next idea, proposal, or initiative? As a leader, ask yourself if you are using this simple engagement technique as often as you could.  Or, out of habit, do you qualify most, if not all, of your “yeses?” I encourage you to look for an immediate opportunity to give a “yes” without condition or constraint.  Unleash the power of the “unequivocal yes!”

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Help Your Team Manage Up

Crucial Conversations: Don’t Start Them This Way

Stop Apologizing…Start Thanking

Bookmark and Share

Help Your Team “Manage Up”

Slide1We’ve all heard the phrase “manage up.”  It’s an easy way of referring to how professionals communicate and interact with their leader for maximum effectiveness.  When I conduct leadership training sessions or workshops, one of the most popular discussions often revolves around how to more effectively “manage up.” For example, leaders are eager to discover ways to deliver information to their leaders that increase the chance of a favorable response.  Professionals are constantly seeking guidance on how to more effectively gain their leader’s support and confidence.

There is a great opportunity here for us, as leaders, to help our team members “manage up” or to more effectively communicate with us.  When was the last time you shared with your team members how you would like them to manage you? When was the last time you shared with them how you like information to be conveyed to you? Have you taken the time to evaluate how you want people to approach you and have you shared that insight with your team members? Are you aware of your idiosyncrasies or pet peeves and have you made your team members aware of those?

Here are a few areas where giving your team members insight into how to manage you can be helpful:

  • Do you prefer electronic or face-to-face communication?
  • Is that preference the same across all types of situations or do you prefer urgent issues to be managed differently?
  • Do you want a high-level overview of a topic first or do you prefer people to dive into the details right away?
  • Do you typically need time to ponder things or are you quick to come to a decision?
  • How do you like people to take initiative? Do you want them to act and then review with you or come up with a plan you can preview?
  • How do you like to handle questions/interruptions?  Do you want them one at a time or have people “batch” things for a longer conversation?
  • Do you need a few minutes when you arrive every morning to get settled or can you dive right in?
  • Do you want people to schedule time with you or try to catch you on the fly?
  • When a problem happens, how do you want to be informed?
  • How much information do you need when you ask someone to “keep you in the loop?”

This is a “starter” list of issues to consider.  I am confident you will come up with many others.

Help your team members succeed with you by helping them learn what you prefer. Don’t make them guess or have to discover the answer by trial and error. Practice assertive communication and let them know how to effectively manage you.

How else can you help your team manage you? If you have any other areas where insight would be helpful, share them in the comments section.

 

If you could benefit from learning more communication skills like these to be a better leader, team member, and top performer, join us for a webinar on Best Kept Communication Secrets August 18th.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

5 Signs You’re a High Caliber Communicator

Is Confirmation Bias Hurting Your Leadership?

Trigger Understanding – Not Defensiveness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bookmark and Share

“I Hate Brussel Sprouts” and Other Poor Choices Even Good Leaders Make

thumbs downIf you are a regular reader of this blog, my social media posts, or have heard me as a keynote speaker, you know I believe the following to be fundamental truths regarding communication and leadership:

  • Words matter. The words you choose to use and the words you choose to lose as a leader and professional can make all the difference in terms of your success as well as the success of your team.
  • High caliber leaders use communication that is positive as opposed to negative. They strive not only to communicate in the positive, but they strive to be positive and to set a positive example.
  • High-hanging fruit matters.  Successful leaders are willing to do the things that others may not be willing to do. They are willing to pay attention to things others might deem either too difficult or too much of stretch. They are willing to reach for the high-hanging fruit.

With these concepts in mind, I’ve been noticing how often even good leaders and stellar professionals may inadvertently be coming across as negative or setting a negative tone.

  • I hate brussel sprouts.
  • I hate it when meetings start late.
  • I hate filing expense reports.
  • I hate conducting performance appraisals.
  • I hate conference calls on speaker phone (I’m guilty of saying this one).
  • I hate it when people act like deadlines don’t matter.

What do each of these statements have in common?  It’s obvious. It’s the “I hate.”  Hate is a VERY strong word and many leaders use it far too cavalierly, far too frequently, and, often inaccurately or unnecessarily. Do you really HATE a food item?  Or, would it be more accurate to say “I don’t like the taste?” Do you really HATE when meetings start late or is it more accurate to say, “I feel disrespected” or, “I feel annoyed when meetings start late?” I believe the word hate ought to be used sparingly and only for those things worthy of one of our strongest negative emotions.

Ask yourself, do I ever casually use the phrase “I hate?” If so, you might be sending a far more negative message than you intend. You may be sending a signal to others that it is ok to be negative. You might be sabotaging your success as a leader.

Take a moment and reach for some high-hanging fruit as a leader. Make a conscious effort to minimize your use of the phrase “I hate.”  Our world is full of far too much of it already.

If you could benefit from learning more communication skills like these to be a better leader, team member, and top performer, join us for a webinar on Best Kept Communication Secrets August 18th.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Stop Undermining Your Credibility with This One Word

Is Confirmation Bias Hurting Your Leadership?

Trigger Understanding – Not Defensiveness

Bookmark and Share

Leadership, Jazz, and Jamie Cullum

pianoLast week I had the opportunity to see my favorite musician, Jamie Cullum, perform an intimate set at the Roxy in West Hollywood.  He’s a jazz (and pop crossover) artist from the UK.  He brought with him two other members of his band, so he performed as a trio (piano, bass, and drums.) As I stood and clapped and sang along and jumped up and down (yes, jumping at a jazz show – it happens) something really interesting occurred.

Towards the end of the set, he asked if there was anyone in the audience who could play the piano in the key of G.  What?!?!?!  Was he really going to pull a complete stranger on stage and allow them to play the piano?  To play a vital role in his show?  Indeed, he did.  And, two very talented pianists had a moment to shine on-stage with him (and take the requisite selfie!) It was impressive.

From a leadership perspective, it took guts.  It took selflessness.  It took confidence.  It took confidence in the two unknowns. And, it took confidence  in his regular bandmates.  It was a great moment in the show. A moment worth emulating as a leader.

  • When was the last time you, as a leader, gave someone a chance to share the spotlight with you?
  • What are you doing to cultivate the kind of trust in your team to have the confidence to step aside and let someone else shine?
  • Who on your team is ready to do more and to be more?  What projects are you handing them?
  • How are you letting others shine? How are you letting them demonstrate their skills and talents?

Great leaders are willing to share the spotlight. Share yours.  It builds confidence, enhances employee engagement, makes great use of resources, and can drive results.

Want more tools on how to be a high-caliber leader like Jamie Cullum? Did you miss the live webinar “High-Caliber Communication: Chart a Career By Choice, Not Chance?”  Download the on-demand version now.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Leadership – It’s Not About the Corner Office

Decide – Are You Cut Out for Leadership?

Speed Skating, Communication and Success

Bookmark and Share

How to Be an “I-Don’t-Know-It-All”

green question markWe all are familiar with a “know-it-all.”  The leader or team member who thinks they know everything. The person who believes they have the best or right answer. They are rarely open to feedback. They rarely ask others for their perspective or insight. Ego rules their decision making. Pride and vanity are hallmarks of their leadership style.

As leaders, confidence is important. Having the ability to make decisions and believe in them is critical to success.  Too much confidence, however, can turn a good leader into a “know-it-all” when high-caliber leaders know they will get the best results when they admit that they don’t know it all. When they are willing to learn from others they can tap into the skills and expertise their team brings.

So, how can high-caliber leaders be an “I-don’t-know-it-all?”

By asking open-ended questions.  Open-ended questions are questions that require more than one right answer or a “yes or no” answer. Open-ended questions allow people to expound. To explain. To clarify. They also give people a sense that their opinion and perspective is valued and respected. Most leaders know the value of open-ended questions.  Here are a few you might not have thought to ask.

  • What didn’t we talk about that we ought to discuss?
  • What didn’t I ask you that I ought to ask?
  • What, if anything, do you think we ought to STOP doing?
  • How can I be of support to you in this project?
  • What kind of feedback would you like me to give?
  • How can we make this project even more effective?
  • What are your “big picture” thoughts about this project?

Which of these questions are you going to add to your leadership toolkit?

Want more tools on how to be a high-caliber leader and communicator? Did you miss the live webinar “High-Caliber Communication: Chart a Career By Choice, Not Chance?”  Download the on-demand version now.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

A “High Caliber Communication” Question

Decide – Are You Cut Out for Leadership?

Communicating with Emotional Intelligence – The Other Kind of Smart

Bookmark and Share

5 Signs You’re a High Caliber Communicator

5 signsCommunication is a leader’s most important skill.  Whether you are a seasoned leader, newly appointed to your leadership role, or seeking to be on the fast-track for advancement, communication will play a vital part in your success.  Take a moment and think about your current communication and ask yourself if these five signs are true of you.

You know the difference between assertive, aggressive, passive, and passive-aggressive.  And, you strive to be consistently assertive in your communication.  Assertive communication is communication which respects the rights of both parties. An assertive communicator is respectful to others without being a pushover or a doormat.  As a leader this means you can have a performance management conversation that leaves your team member clear about where they need to improve and what is expected of them, (no having to guess, which is a sign of passive-aggressiveness) while still feeling valued and appreciated.

You think about the impact your communication has on people’s feelings. High caliber communicators know the way people feel is a big driver of engagement, teamwork, commitment, and many other positive employee traits. How a leader communicates with their employees has a direct impact on their feelings.  A high caliber leader is aware of this and works to communicate in a way that helps people feel respected, appreciated, and valued.

You know that words matter and you choose wisely. A high caliber communicator avoids “command and control” language and instead chooses language that empowers.  A high caliber communicator knows the words to choose that can drive cooperation and commitment and strives to avoid the words that trigger defensiveness and disengagement.  Do you know the words to choose and the words to lose?

You don’t put off feedback, performance management, or difficult conversations. High caliber communicators have the skills to handle difficult conversations with tact and finesse.  You know you are a high caliber communicator, and likely a high caliber leader, if you are able to give negative feedback directly and respectfully. Ignoring performance problems because the conversation is uncomfortable can negatively impact the entire team. A high caliber leader has these conversations in a timely manner.

You are able to apologize, or admit when wrong. High caliber communicators know they aren’t always right.  And, they are able to admit when they have made a mistake and offer an apology (which is more than simply saying “sorry” – a word that is a poor choice). They are able to swallow their pride, put their ego in check, and admit when they are wrong. They know that an effective apology isn’t about excuses or blame. Rather, it is about honoring the feelings of others and focusing how they intend to make it right (or better) in the future.  High caliber leaders who are able to apologize build trust and respect within their teams.

Are you a high caliber communicator? Which area would you like to improve?

Whether you have years of experience as a leader or you are a team member looking for enhanced career success, this high caliber communication skills webinar can be your ticket to success! Join us tomorrow, February 18, 2016. To thank you for reading this blog, I’d like to offer you the 10% discount code – SOCIAL.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Decide – Are You Cut Out for Leadership?

3 Keys to High Caliber Communication – Are You Using Them?

“You Don’t Understand” – Words to Choose and Words to Lose

 

Bookmark and Share

A “High Caliber Communication” Question

ask yourselfYou may have heard or read some version of the following:

The quality of your life is, to a degree, directly related to the quality of the questions you ask.

As a leadership and communication expert, I believe that the following is also true:

The quality of your leadership is related to the quality of the questions you ask.

This goes for the types of questions you ask your team, your peers, your leaders, as well as the questions you ask yourself.

There is one key question that high caliber leaders and communicators can ask themselves that can directly impact their success as a leader and as a professional.  That question is:

How do I want the people I lead to feel?

Research is very clear that how people feel at work, particularly how their leader makes them feel, is a key driver of engagement, retention, teamwork, productivity, and more. When people feel valued and respected, for example, they are more likely to stay engaged and committed. In contrast, when employees don’t think their leader appreciates them or if they feel they “work for a jerk” they are highly likely to seek opportunities elsewhere.

Ask yourself, how do I want people to feel? If you are like most high caliber leaders, you want people to feel:

  • appreciated
  • respected
  • empowered
  • confident
  • trusted
  • challenged
  • energized
  • valued

Is the way you are communicating reflecting that goal? Are you choosing the words that build people up or the words that tear people down? Are you unwittingly sabotaging your success by bad communication habits such as asking “Are you busy?”

High caliber leaders and professionals know the questions they ask of themselves can be just as important as the questions they ask of others. Asking, “How do I want my employees (my boss, my peers, my audience, my family, my party guests…) to feel?” in any given situation can help you make communication choices that yield positive results.

If you would like to communicate in a way that is congruent with the positive feelings you would like to people to have, if you would like to avoid sabotaging your leadership success with poor communication choices, and you would like to enhance employee engagement by communicating as a “power to” leader instead of a “power over” leader, I invite you to join my upcoming webinar, “High Caliber Communication.”

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

The Best Question to Ask Yourself as a Leader

3 Keys to High Caliber Communication – Are You Using Them?

Leader’s Toolkit for Difficult and Disciplinary Conversations – Webinar

Bookmark and Share

3 Keys to High Caliber Communication – Are You Using Them?

words_have power_SQHave you ever noticed that some people seem to naturally communicate in a confident and engaging way without coming on too strong or being a pushover? Do you know professionals who are able to present their ideas and solutions in ways that get attention, authority and respect while others seem to flounder or fail to persuade?

Would you, or members of your team, like to  communicate in a more compelling fashion for greater credibility, influence, and impact?  If so, the upcoming webinar “High Caliber Communication” is a fast-paced and content-rich program you can easily access.

The live broadcast is on February 18, 2016 at 12:00 PT (1:00 MT, 2:00 CT, 3:00 ET.)  Every registration comes with a complimentary downloadable version of the live event, so no need to fret if the live broadcast time doesn’t work for you.  You can learn (and review) at a time that is convenient for you!

In this hour-long event, we will discuss 3 very important things high caliber communicators do differently from average communicators.

High caliber communication is:

  1. Positive
  2. Future focused
  3. Specific

Learn how to integrate these 3 key factors into all types of communication.

Boost your communication effectiveness and drive results

  • Discover the words to choose and the words to lose to give more effective directions, instructions, and delegation for enhanced results.
  • Master the art of feedback that moves people, even poor performers, to behavior change and improved performance.
  • Enhance your ability to ask high caliber questions that uncover hidden barriers to success and high performance.

Leverage High Caliber Communication for Enhanced Leadership and Career Success

  • Learn what high caliber leaders and communicators know about the relationship dimension of communication and make that insight work to boost employee engagement no matter your job description or title.
  • Uncover 5 communication bad habits that might be sabotaging your leadership and credibility.
  • Discover how to effectively communicate your value to your organization, without being pushy.

Pump up personal and team productivity with high caliber communication.

  • Stop the tyranny of the trivial. Master the art of setting limits and boundaries to focus on strategic goals and objectives.
  • Enhance your critical thinking and decision-making skills and start getting (more) credit for contributions.
  • Keep teams on track and on target with better communication during meetings and group conversations.

Whether you are a seasoned leader or a team member looking for enhanced career success, high caliber communication skills can be your ticket to success! Join us February 18, 2016.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

3 Easy Phrases to Use in 2016 to Communicate More Effectively

What Not to Say: A Guide to Keeping Your Foot Out of Your Mouth – Webinar!

Leader’s Toolkit for Difficult and Disciplinary Conversations – Webinar

Bookmark and Share

Decide – Are You Cut Out for Leadership?

wieghing decisionsjpgHow decisive are you? I recently had a conversation with an Executive Vice President of Human Resources about the critical qualities of a leader. High on his list was the ability to make decisions. In his experience, employees who want to take on a formal leadership role who are unable to make decisions are not successful. The desire to please everyone, to sit on the fence, to “go with the flow,” and stay neutral in difficult situations is a leadership liability.

How decisive are you? Here are a few tools to help you demonstrate your decisiveness and highlight that you are ready to step into a formal leadership role or that you will thrive in your current leadership role.

  • Make decisions within your current sphere of influence, regardless of how small that sphere may be. Start with small things and larger opportunities will present themselves.
  • Be a problem solver. Any time you point out a problem in your current organization, make a recommendation or also offer your preferred solution.
  • Hone your critical thinking skills. Good decisions are made using good critical thinking. Engage in “cost-benefit analysis” and be able to articulate both the benefits and the costs of your decision. Remember, costs come in many forms beyond the financial. Being able to articulate a broad range of both benefits and costs will demonstrate that you have a grasp of your organization as a whole. It will demonstrate you have a solid grasp of business principles and can see beyond the here and now of your own team, department or division.
  • Don’t “hide” or downplay the risks or the costs inherent within your decision. Failing to acknowledge the downside of a decision, or worse yet, trying to hide the downside, can be disastrous. Failing to acknowledge the downside can make a leader look, at best, naive and, at worst, manipulative. Effective decision makers acknowledge the downside and clearly articulate how the benefits outweigh the costs.
  • Defend your decisions without becoming defensive. Leaders are often called upon to provide rationale or justification for their decisions. Sometimes decisions will be downright challenged by others. Your ability to speak logically and not take things personally speaks volumes about your leadership ability.
  • Check your behavior in meetings and group discussions. Do you share your opinions or do you try to placate all the, sometimes contradictory, opinions of others? Too much fence-sitting, wishy-washiness, or people-pleasing is a sign that you may not be ready for the challenges formal leadership brings.

Decisiveness is a critical leadership ability. By using the above tips you can display your ability to lead by displaying your decisiveness.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Is Confirmation Bias Hurting Your Leadership?

Assertive Communication – What it Really Takes

Lagging VS. Leading Indicators

 

Bookmark and Share