Archive for the ‘Emotional Intelligence’ Category

Live Emotional Intelligence Webinar!

GotEQ10BB_Cvrs.inddIt’s no secret, emotionally intelligent people typically make the best leaders and team members. The great news is that emotional intelligence (EQ) can be developed and enhanced. Move beyond the theory of EQ and into the tools needed to build EQ and take communication and leadership to greater levels of success and productivity.

Got EQ? How to Communicate with Emotional Intelligence

Live Webinar Thursday, May 19, 2016

REGISTER HERE

Can’t make the live event? A downloadable version comes with your registration.

EQ – What it is, why it matters and how to leverage it for success.

  • Learn the 4 keys to strategically enhancing EQ and access simple ways to implement them.
  • Discover your own EQ communication quotient and identify personal areas of focus for improvement.
  • Build your emotional vocabulary for better EQ instantly.

 Decrease conflict and stress by communicating with EQ.

  • Discover little known secrets of self-talk to minimize conflict, confrontation, and destructive communication.
  • Communicate with more confidence in difficult situations with powerful and emotionally intelligent language patterns and templates.
  • Stop reacting to difficult people and stressful situations and start responding in powerful and constructive ways.

 Increase self-awareness for better relationships, leadership, and productivity.

  • Become the master of your emotions and stop letting emotions be the master of you.
  • Master the art of re-framing to boost problem-solving, decrease conflict, and increase empathy and understanding.
  • Uncover bad habits that are stunting your EQ and stop sabotaging your leadership success and credibility.

REGISTER HERE

Pamela Jett is an internationally recognized presenter and author on developing leadership skills and improving workplace relationships. Her programs take participants beyond theory to hands-on application for immediate results. Her background includes:

* Working with clientele ranging from the high-tech sector and manufacturing to women’s groups and government agencies

* Serving clients such as Lockheed Martin, Allstate Insurance, Sony, The United Way, NASA, Waste Management plus many other notable organizations

* Developing several books and learning programs including “Communicate to Keep ‘Em: Enhancing Employee Engagement Through Remarkable Communication”

Additional Materials:

  • Participant note-taking guide for use during the event and for reference post event
  • Access to regular communication tools and techniques via Pamela’s Words Matter blog
  • The complete download of the event
  • Access to free assessments to enhance communication and leadership

Who Should Attend:

  • Leaders, Managers, and Supervisors
  • Project Managers
  • Team Leads
  • Administrative Assistants
  • Support Staff
  • Anyone who works in a team environment

REGISTER HERE

FAST – Get right down to business with no time wasted. This is a content-rich experience without fluff or filler.

CONVENIENT – Learn right at your desk. No expensive travel, no time out of the office, and no time wasted. All you need is a computer and it’s super easy. You will be sent all the log-in information. Can’t make the live event? Play the download (included with every registration) when the time is right for you.

APPLICABLE IMMEDIATELY – This experience will provide time and money saving tools to use the moment you hang up the phone.

AFFORDABLE – Priced at just $89 for individual registration, this is a fraction of the cost of other high-priced events or seminars. Plus, there is no additional travel expense. Ideal for multiple listeners too! Group pricing is only $147.

 

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Got EQ? How to Communicate with Emotional Intelligence

woman with lightbulbIt is well established that emotional intelligence, often known as EQ, is one of the fastest growing job skills.  Leaders and professionals with high EQ are typically:

  • Better listeners
  • Better problem solvers
  • More emotionally stable
  • More open-minded
  • More flexible
  • More empathetic
  • Better conflict managers
  • Better crisis managers
  • Better team players
  • More open to feedback
  • More open to change
  • Less sensitive to imagined slights
  • Less prone to vindictiveness
  • Less ego maniacal

And, the list goes on and on. It’s no wonder that high EQ is associated with promotability and other career opportunities.

So, what are you doing to boost yours?  There are several steps to increasing your EQ.

Step #1 Realize that EQ is something that can be improved.  Emotional intelligence is not a fixed trait. It is something that can be developed with effort and intention.

Step #2 Be humble (which means teachable) and realize that no matter how strong you believe your EQ is, it can always get better. Be willing to look at yourself and ask if you want the benefits above enough to put in some effort.

Step #3 Know where to focus your improvement efforts.  Emotional Intelligence is a multi-faceted ability. It is the ability to identify, understand, manage, and  use emotions in a positive and constructive way. There are opportunities to improve in many areas.  For example, you can become more adept at identifying your emotions and in the process be building your EQ.

If you are looking for a simple way to know where to focus your efforts and energies, you can take this quick EQ Assessment.

Step #4 Access the resources and tools you need.  Take the time to access and learn new EQ skills.  Make developing this skill a top priority. Make it part of your personal professional development plan. That may mean attending webinars, reading books, watching videos, or attending workshops.  This expenditure of time and resources is sure to pay off.  Especially if you put the tools and skills you access into practice.

Whether you are a leader or looking to move into a formal leadership position, or you are hoping to get the attention, authority, and respect you deserve at work, building your EQ can be your ticket to success!

If you or your colleagues could benefit from learning more tips to communicate with emotional intelligence, please tune into our live webinar May 19, 2016. You will learn what “EQ” is, why it matters, and how to leverage it to decrease conflict, eliminate stress, improve relationships and your leadership skills. Register here. 

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Emotional Intelligence: Your Leadership Superpower

3 Things Emotionally Intelligent People DON’T Do

Trigger Cooperation – Not Defensiveness

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Emotional Intelligence: Your Leadership Superpower

superheroIt’s no secret.  Emotional intelligence, EQ, is a necessary skill set for a leader who wants to be effective. Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, understand, manage, and use emotions in positive and constructive ways.

Leaders who are able to leverage their emotional intelligence, their EQ, are able to be the master of their emotions and not let their emotions be the master of them. This ability can be vital when trying to communicate effectively.  EQ can assist in a leader’s ability to choose the words to use and the words to lose.

One effective way to increase your EQ is to build your emotional vocabulary. All too often when we experience emotions we tend to label them with the easiest or most frequently used label.  For example, when something bothers us we are often quick to tell ourselves that we are “angry.”  And, it stands to reason that if we say we label the emotion we are experiencing as “anger” it might be difficult to stay calm. It might be difficult to communicate in a respectful and professional manner.

What if instead of labeling the emotion “anger,” we do a quick self-check and determine if another word would be more accurate? For example, what if “irritated” or “annoyed” or “frustrated” is a more accurate label? It is often much easier to stay calm and to make wise communication choices when we are only “annoyed” rather than “angry.”

Professionals who consciously work to build their emotional vocabularies and who strive to label their emotions more accurately are putting EQ into action. A leader who more accurately identifies their emotions is better equipped to manage and use those emotions in positive and constructive ways.  Build your emotional vocabulary and build your EQ.

 

If you could benefit from more tools to be an emotionally intelligent, high caliber leader, listen to this webinar on Building an Emotionally Intelligent Team, Thursday, March 24th.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Self-Talk for Emotional Control

Communicating with Emotional Intelligence – The Other Kind of Smart

Conflict, Communication, and Your Emotional Vocabulary

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The Best Question to Ask Yourself as a Leader

feelings word cloudIt’s that time of year.  That time when we resolve to be better and do better in many aspects of our lives.  Many of you start your year off with goals, resolutions, and even personal strategic plans (my favorite.) What if there was one question you could ask yourself that could impact the likelihood of achieving your goals and objectives for 2016? This question can be modified to fit every area of your life, in particular, your life as a leader.

The premise of this question is to tie your goals, plans, resolutions to emotional outcomes. When we tie our plans to how we want to feel or how we want our team members to feel, we increase our motivation to behave in alignment with our goals and objectives.  Consider revisiting the goals you’ve recently set for yourself and add an emotional outcome.

Ask yourself:

How do I want to feel? (healthy, confident, in charge, happy – these are a few examples for personal goals.)

How do I want my family members to feel? (loved, appreciated, understood – great outcomes for personal relationships.)

How do I want my team members to feel? (valued, respected, empowered – these can be powerful in your leadership role.)

A tweak to this question is, “How do I think my team members (children, spouse, etc…) currently feel?” If you suspect that they don’t feel valued, respected, etc… then you can begin to make changes to elicit more positive feelings. And, for those of you wondering, the #1 reason good people quit is that they don’t like how their leaders make them feel. Emotional outcomes do matter.

By adding a reminder of how we want to feel, or how we want others to feel, we can check to see if our current actions are in alignment with those feelings.  If not, we can adjust those actions and move forward towards achieving success.

Connecting your goals, resolutions, and strategic plans to emotional outcomes can increase your likelihood of keeping those resolutions. Go ahead and revisit the goals you likely just set, add emotional outcomes and have a fabulous 2016!

 

Pamela Jett is a communication skills and leadership expert who knows that words matter! In her keynote presentations, workshops, books and online learning programs, she moves beyond communication theory into practical strategies that can be implemented immediately to create the kind of leadership, teamwork, and employee engagement results her clients want.

You might also enjoy:

Leadership – It’s Not About the Corner Office

Beyond Goal Setting 101

Communication and Goal Setting

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Trigger Cooperation – Not Defensiveness

steaming madby Pamela Jett, CSP

Conflict is inevitable, in even the very best workplaces and relationships. Some people, however, seem to engage in conflict and confrontation with more confidence and with less escalation. Here are are few tips to help you do the same.

Q- TIP!

Quit taking it personally. Remember, it is typically not about you (even when others try to make it sound like it is.) When other people behave in combative and hostile ways it is typically a reflection of their fears and insecurities.

Respond as Opposed to React

Professionals choose their behavior based on their values and objectives as opposed to simply reacting to the behaviors of others.

Be an Exceptional Listener

In particular, listen for the unspoken fear in the other person’s communication. Often, the difficult or inappropriate behaviors of others is based in fear. Understanding that can enhance our ability to respond effectively.

Words Matter

Choose your words wisely. Some words can trigger defensiveness and others cooperation. Be intentional in your word choice.

For more tools and techniques to help you manage conflict and confrontation with more confidence, visit Jettwebinars.com.

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Self Talk For Emotional Control (part 2)

Keys for Better Self-Talk During Emotionally Charged Situations

by Pamela Jett

Key #2 (part 2 of 3)

We previously learned that self-talk during emotionally charged situations is more effective if you plant the desired behavior (I am calm) in your mind instead of the undesired behavior (I am not angry.)

i am strongHere is key #2. Make your self-talk in the present tense. For example, instead of saying to yourself “I will be patient,” say, “I am patient.” Even if you don’t feel patient in the moment, tell yourself you are.

Using “present tense” self-talk helps you engage in the desired behavior right at that very moment.

Key #3 coming soon!

For more tools to stay calm, cool, and collected during emotionally charged situations, register for Pamela’s webinar series Conflict and Confrontation: Critical Skills at Jettwebinars.com or by clicking here.

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“You Don’t Understand” – Words to Choose and Words to Lose

jettlogo2Have you ever found yourself in a difficult conversation feeling frustrated? Misunderstood? Devalued? These negative emotions can often lead to communication choices that are counterproductive. For example, have you ever said (or, let’s be candid, maybe even yelled) “you don’t understand” during a difficult conversation? Not surprisingly, this can trigger defensiveness and hostility in others.

Here are a few thoughts about what to say instead. First, check yourself. Are you sure they don’t understand? Might some of your frustration stem from them not agreeing? Sometimes, we accuse people of not understanding or not listening to us when the truth is that they likely understand, but don’t agree.

Next, choose to communicate in a way that accurately expresses what you are feeling in a non-accusatory way such as:

  • “I’m not feeling heard.”
  • “I’m not feeling valued.”
  • “I’m feeling frustrated.”

Or

  • “We see this differently.”
  • “We have different perspectives at play here.”

While none of these options will work in every single difficult conversation, they are alternatives to the accusatory “you don’t understand” and can often move a conversation forward in a less hostile, more productive way.

For more of the words to choose and the words to lose, read Pamela’s book “Communicate to Keep ‘Em” available here.

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3 Simple Skills to Improve Your Communication (part 3)

by Pamela Jett, CSP

It’s no secret, communication is the #1 skills set professionals at every level ought to be polishing.  Research reveals that 80% of problems in most workplaces are caused by poor communication.  Whether you are a support staff person, a mid-level manager, or a C-suite level leader, better communication skills will help you achieve your goals and make a positive difference.

So, how can we begin to communicate more effectively starting today?  By following a few simple rules.  In previous posts I shared that rule #1 is to communicate in the positive and rule #2 is practice future focused communication.  Here is rule #3.

Communicate with an “Effective” Focus.  Almost every person I know, myself included, likes to be right.  We like to get in the last word.  We like to win.  We are tempted to say “I told you so.” We don’t like to admit when we are wrong. And we often struggle to apologize.  Many of us dig in our heels.  We become stubborn.  We might be a “my way or the highway” type of leader.  We even become difficult to work with and for.  This approach to communication can have severe consequences:

    • Conflict can escalate or turn destructive.
    • Minor issues can cause major relationship damage.
    • Even inconsequential things become a battle.
    • Relationships can suffer, teamwork suffers, and turnover increases.

One simple way to alleviate these consequences is to focus on effectiveness instead of being right.  A focus on effectiveness means that sometimes we sacrifice our need to be right in order to achieve a greater good or higher objective.  One simple way to do this is to replace the phrase “I disagree” with “I see it differently.”  “I disagree” sets up an “I’m right – you’re wrong” dichotomy.  “I see it differently” doesn’t create that dichotomy and is less defense or confrontation producing.

Communication is a vital tool for our success.  And, by following these simple rules for better communication, you can be a better communicator today!

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3 Simple Skills to Improve Your Communication (part 2)

by Pamela Jett, CSP

It’s no secret, communication is the #1 skills set professionals at every level ought to be polishing.  Research reveals that 80% of problems in most workplaces are caused by poor communication.  Whether you are a support staff person, a mid-level manager, or a C-suite level leader, better communication skills will help you achieve your goals and make a positive difference.

So, how can we begin to communicate more effectively starting today?  By following a few simple rules.  In a previous post I shared that rule #1 is to communicate in the positive.  Rule #2 is:

Communicate with a Future Focus.  How many times have you sat in a meeting where past mistakes or issues seem to dominate the conversation?  How many countless hours have been spent talking about the way things used to be done?  How much time do you spend in your relationships, both personal and professional, bringing up the past?  Chances are, the answer is too often, too many, too much!  When too much time is spent focusing on the past several things happen:

    • We don’t make much forward progress.
    • We can experience frustration because we can’t change the past and hopelessness can set in.
    • We might feel constantly “punished” when others refuse to let by gones be by gones and this can damage relationships.
    • We aren’t given the chance to learn, grow and evolve which can lead to disengagement.

Great communicators know that while it is important to acknowledge and learn from the past, including past mistakes, in order to foster an environment where productivity, creativity, and innovation thrive, a future focus is best.  And, a future focus also helps foster better, more positive relationships – a plus in any environment.  One simple technique you can experiment with today is to add the phrase “next time” to your conversations, especially those conversations that revolve around errors.  For example, if a problem occurs you can say “That is a problem.  What can we do next time to make sure it doesn’t happen?”  This small change can keep things moving forward and not stuck in the past.

Continue reading Pamela’s blog for rule #3.

 

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3 Simple Skills to Improve Your Communication (part 1)

by Pamela Jett, CSP

It’s no secret, communication is the #1 skill set professionals at every level ought to be polishing.  Research reveals that 80% of problems in most workplaces are caused by poor communication.  Whether you are a support staff person, a mid-level manager, or a C-Suite executive better communication skills will help you achieve your goals and make a positive difference.

So, how can we begin to communicate more effectively starting today?  By following 3 simple rules.  Here is rule #1.

Rule #1 – Communicate in the Positive.  So many of us spend time communicating in the negative.  Think about it.  How many of your conversations, especially if you are in a leadership or supervisory role, revolve around what went wrong, errors that need correcting, what you don’t want employees to do?  For many professionals (and even parents) negative communication is the norm.  “Don’t do that.”  “This is incorrect.”  “You’ve made a mistake.”  When we as professionals are bombarded with negative messages several things happen:

    • We can start to feel unappreciated which can lead to disengagement.
    • We might stop taking risks or trying new things because it isn’t safe to fail.
    • We don’t enjoy coming to work and might start to show it with a bad attitude.
    • We don’t do the right things because we’ve been told what not to do, but not what to do instead.

This last consequence points to the solution.  The next time you are tempted to tell someone what “not to do” ask yourself “what do I want them to do instead?”  And, communicate that!  Stop telling people what not to do and start telling them what to do instead.  This is one of the easiest way to begin to communicate in the positive, today.

Continue reading Pamela’s blog for rules #2 and #3.

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