Archive for the ‘criticism’ Category

Leader’s Toolkit for Difficult and Disciplinary Conversations – Webinar

Leaders of every level, from first time supervisors to senior executives, agree that one of their most difficult responsibilities is having disciplinary or difficult conversations. In fact, many leaders often ignore problems and hope that they will go away (and, of course, they rarely do.) Having language patterns and tools to specifically handle these tough conversations is what every leader needs and what this program provides. Loaded with practical communication tools for senior level executives to first-time supervisors and even parents, this webinar will give you practical tools you can put to work immediately and relieve some of the stress associated with disciplinary conversations.

REGISTER HERE

CALL 866.726.5388 FOR GROUP RATE (2 or more)

Get the leadership mindset to make disciplinary conversations easier

  • Learn to differentiate between “can’t do” and “won’t do” issues.
  • Discover why people don’t do what they are supposed to do and how to ignite positive behavior change.
  • Master the art of staying calm during difficult conversations.

Master communication tactics and language patterns to prepare for tough conversations

  • Discover the 4-step process to request behavior change.
  • Learn how to use the “BCA technique” as a template for almost any difficult conversation.
  • Find out why you ought to stop feeding carrots to stick people.

Learn how to manage tense conversations with difficult people

  • Discover what to say/do when tears flow.
  • Learn what never to say during a disciplinary conversation – hint… it’s not what you think.
  • Discover the power of silence.
  • Learn how to keep records and notes so that you can hold people accountable.
  • Master the art of open ended questions to gain cooperation.

When: Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014 at 12:00 pm PST; 1:00 pm MTN; 2:00 pm CST; 3:00 pm EST

REGISTER HERE

CALL 866.726.5388 FOR GROUP RATE (2 or more)

Additional Inclusive Webinar Materials

Participant note-taking guide for use during the event and for reference post event.
Access to regular communication tools and techniques via Pamela’s Words Matter blog.
The complete audio recording of the event.

Who Should Attend

Leaders, Managers, and Supervisors
Project Managers
Team Leads

FAST – Get right down to business with no time wasted.

This is a content-rich experience without fluff or filler.

CONVENIENT – Learn right at your desk.

No expensive travel, no time out of the office, and no time wasted. Can’t make the live webinar? Watch the recording when the time is right for you.

APPLICABLE IMMEDIATELY

This experience will provide time and money saving tools to use immediately.

 AFFORDABLE –

Priced at just $79, this is a fraction of the cost of other high-priced events or seminars. Plus, there is no additional travel expense. Ideal for multiple listeners too!

REGISTER HERE

CALL 866.726.5388 FOR GROUP RATE (2 or more)

What’s Next?

October 16: What Not to Say: A Guide for Keeping Your Foot Out of Your Mouth

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New Webinar – Crucial Conversations: Tools for HR Pros – Aug 27th

Human resource professionals are often tasked with having crucial or difficult conversations. These are the kinds of conversations when the stakes are high and emotions run deep. Wouldn’t it be great if you had tools to make those conversations easier? In this fast-paced,skill-building webinar you will discover communication skills to make every conversation easier, less stressful, and more productive – even with difficult people!

When?  Wednesday August 27th, noon PT (Remember, you get a full recording if this time doesn’t work for you.)

Register now here!

For Groups of two or more, register now here!

Get off to the right start – every time

  • Leverage the secret the most productive HR pros use – scripting.
  • Beyond the basics – savvy techniques for starting a conversation off on the right track.
  • Build rapport and minimize defensiveness with powerful personality insights

Language patterns and scripts for success

  • Discover the words to choose and the words to lose to increase cooperation and understanding
  • Powerful templates for disciplinary and other crucial conversations – stop winging it.
  • Increase buy-in and commitment with one simple technique

What to do when emotions run high – yours and theirs

  • Master simple strategies to stay calm, cool, and collected during to toughest conversations.
  • What to say and do with those who cry, blame, and other negative behaviors
  • Discover how to “stop feeding carrots” to stick people and minimize other self sabotaging behaviors for crucial conversation success.

Whether you have these crucial conversations yourself or need to coach managers and supervisors how to have their own conversations with employees, this program is loaded with tools to make it easier.

Register now here!

For Groups of two or more, register now here!

Additional Inclusive Webinar Materials

  • Participant note-taking guide for use during the event and for reference post event.
  • Access to regular communication tools and techniques via Pamela’s Words Matter blog.
  • The complete audio recording of the event.

Who Should Attend

  • Leaders, Managers, and Supervisors
  • Project Managers
  • Team Leads
  • Administrative Assistants
  • Support Staff
  • Anyone who works in a team environment

FAST – Get right down to business with no time wasted.

This is a content-rich experience without fluff or filler.

CONVENIENT – Learn right at your desk.

No expensive travel, no time out of the office, and no time wasted. Can’t make the live webinar? Watch to the recording when the time is right for you.

APPLICABLE IMMEDIATELY –

This experience will provide time and money saving tools to use immediately.

 

AFFORDABLE –

Priced at just $79, this is a fraction of the cost of other high-priced events or seminars. Plus, there is no additional travel expense. Ideal for multiple listeners too!

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Communicate Expectations for Performance Improvement

by Pamela Jett, CSP

“What was she thinking?”

“Doesn’t he know that’s not how we do things around here?”

“He ought to know better.”

“I should not have to explain this to her.”

If you are a leader, you might often think these things in response to employee behavior.  Sometimes, it seems as if employees are intentionally engaging in behavior that seems lacking in good judgement or common sense.  It can be frustrating when employees seem to flaunt the unspoken behavioral norms or rules in organizations.  We think they ought to know better.

My advice to leaders who experience this frustration is to remember that:

Not Everyone Was Raised at Your House!

While some things may just seem to be simple commons sense to you, perhaps they were not raised with the same example of smart decision making as you were.  Things that seem obvious to you might not be so obvious to them because they haven’t had the same experiences as you.  Quite simply,  not everyone was raised at your house.

Given that “common sense” isn’t exactly common and that some people simply don’t follow the “cultural norms” or the “unspoken rules” within your organization, what can you as a leader do to help them improve an employee’s performance in these areas?

First, remember that not all people are as adept at reading social signals and picking up on norms as others.  They require clear communication of expectations even if you think “I really shouldn’t have to tell them this.” Or, “they ought to have figured this out by now.”

Second, provide clear communication about social norms or “unwritten rules.”  Do so in a positive fashion.  For example:

I want to keep you in the loop.  Most successful people in this organization choose to not discuss politics with their peers during work hours.

Or,

As your supervisor, I thought I would give you the inside scoop.  Even though our dress code is “business casual”, when executive leadership visits our site, most people opt to dress a bit more formal.

Or,

I wanted to give you a heads up.  Even though it is not spelled out in the employee handbook, sending lots of text messages are frowned upon in this organization.

Once you’ve clearly  and positively communicated your expectations or the “unwritten rules” it is then easier to coach people to success or to hold them accountable, even for the “unwritten rules.”

If you have ideas or suggestions on how to hold people accountable for the “unwritten rules” or “norms”, I would love your comments.

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Employee Mistakes and Communication

by Pamela Jett, CSP

I read in today’s edition of the Harvard Business Review’s on-line management tip of the day that it is vitally important for leaders and managers to let employees make mistakes.  I would agree.  It is often wise to step-in and correct an employee before a mistake is made, especially if it will be a large or costly error.  However, it is also often wise to step back and allow an employee to make a mistake and then coach them on the back end on how to either fix it or do better in the future.

By allowing employees the freedom to learn from their mistakes, leaders are not only contributing to an employee’s sense of personal responsibility and success, they are also improving employee engagement.  It is a well known fact that people like their own ideas the most and will be committed and engaged in implementing solutions or ideas that they help create.

So how can a leader or manager use remarkable communication to coach an employee after a mistake has been made?  One way is to make sure you communicate in the positive, not the negative.  Sometimes as leaders we are so busy telling people what not to do that we forget to tell them what right looks like.  Monitor your use of the word “don’t” and make a concerted effort to “ditch the don’t” and communicate in the positive, not the negative.  Share with employees what you would like them to do next time.  Better yet, ask them what they think they ought to do next time.  You will enhance employee engagement by asking employees (or your children if you are being a leader at home) for their input.

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Help your employees, your children, your colleagues, and even yourself learn from mistakes.  Use remarkable communication to help them learn and you will see commitment and employee engagement soar!

How has communicating in the positive helped you?  Leave a comment and share your success story!

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3 Ways to Respond to Criticism

By Pamela Jett

Being on the receiving end of criticism or dissatisfaction can be a challenging situation for any professional. It is difficult to respond to criticism in a professional and productive fashion. Here are three tools that can make doing so a lot easier.

1. Do not say œI™m sorry when responding to criticism. If your leader is dissatisfied with something you have done and tells you so, a more professional way to start your response is with something along the lines of œyou are right “ thank you for pointing this out to me or œI apologize (a very different message from™ I™m sorry™) – thank you for taking the time to tell me. Saying œI™m sorry is a weak form of communication. Using a more powerful form of communication will enhance your credibility and professional image “ even under challenging circumstances.

2. Instead of saying œwhat don™t you like about..? say œwhat would you change about¦? By using œwhat would you change about¦? you increase the likelihood that you will receive feedback that is truly constructive and helpful. One of the challenges many leaders face is that they spend so much time telling people what is wrong that they forget to tell people what right looks like. By using this simple turn of phrase, you help your leader stay focused on the positive and decrease the likelihood that they will dwell (to excess) on the negative.

3. Become comfortable with the phrase œnext time I will¦ When a savvy professional receives criticism, they will focus on what they learned and how they will apply what they learned next time. This keeps the conversation focused on the future and reinforces that you are a professional who learns from their mistakes.

Sometimes small changes in our word choices can make a profound difference in our success. Professionals who use one or all of the techniques above will find handling criticism in a confident manner substantially easier. If you have a way of handling criticism with tact and finesse, e-mail me, Pamela@JettCT.com, I would love to learn from you.

Pamela Jett is a communication skills expert who believes that words matter. She works with organizations, associations and individuals who want to improve their communication skills for business and personal success. She can be reached toll free at 866.726.5388 or at her website www.JettCT.com .

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